Forgotten Darkness

Strange things are lost and forgotten in obscure corners of the newspaper.

September 16th, 2019    

50 - The Murder of L. Sealey Houk

The story of the murder of L. Sealey Houk and the arrest of Rocco Racco, as told in a reading from "Pinkertons Write History of the Houk Case for the Herald," New Castle Herald, October 3, 1908.

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

My Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/forgdark/

Opening music from https://filmmusic.io. "Dark Child" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com). License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Closing music by Soma.

September 9th, 2019    

49 - The Phantoms of ‘52

The highways of the Midwestern United States were home to two unidentified individuals known as “phantoms” in 1952. Well, one individual and one that very well may have been mass hysteria. These are the stories of the 40 Phantom that haunted Ohio's roadways, terrified truck drivers, and resembled something from a Misfits song or Rob Zombie video; and the Blue Phantom, who took potshots at Illinois motorists (maybe), are featured.

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

My Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/forgdark/

Opening music from https://filmmusic.io. "Dark Child" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com). License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES – 40 Phantom

Zanesville Times-Recorder, March 29, 1952.

“Columbus man is victim; stolen auto recovered.”  Newark Advocate, March 4, 1952.

“Frightened drivers glimpse Route 40 phantom in area.”  Salem News, March 27, 1952.

“Green phantom blamed in wreck; gagster fined.”  East Liverpool Evening Review, March 29, 1952.

“Green phantom fails to show after calls.”  Salem News, March 31, 1952.

“Highway ghost phones warning of tonight's run.”  East Liverpool Evening Review, March 28, 1952.

“Highway phantom calls his shot.”  Zanesville Times-Recorder, March 29, 1952.

“His name is Legion.”  Marion Star, March 19, 1952.

“Jury visits highway crime scene,”  Newark Advocate, April 29, 1952.

“Lausche refuses to intervene in Louis Angel case.”  Newark Advocate, January 23, 1953.

“Legion enter chase for phantom gunman.”  Raleigh Register (Beckley, WV), February 19, 1952.

“Marshall challenges phantom.”  Zanesville Times-Recorder, March 20, 1952.

“Mystery gunman clue uncovered,”  Charleston (WV) Daily Mail, February 14, 1952.

“Pawnbroker says he lent Angel $20 on murder gun.”  Lancaster Eagle-Gazette, May 1, 1952.

“Phantom gunman sought by police.” Charleston (WV) Daily Mail, February 1, 1952.

“Phantom dares Ohio sheriff.” Anderson (IN) Herald, March 16, 1952.

“Phantom does as boasted, haunts Rt. 7.” Salem News, March 29, 1952.

“Phantom driver scares truckers on Ohio highway.” New Philadelphia Daily Times, March 7, 1952.

“Phantom seen again.” Mansfield News-Journal, March 20, 1952.

“Phantom skeleton may be dancing now on Route 7.” East Liverpool Evening Review, March 13, 1952.

“Route 40 phantom chases 4 drivers near West Point.” East Liverpool Evening Review, March 27, 1952.

“Route 40 phantom frightens auto, truck drivers in Ohio.” Cumberland (MD) Evening Times, March 7, 1952.

“Rt. 40 phantom utilizes green smoke screen.” Salem News, March 20, 1952.

“Takes latest scientific gadgets for successful ghost these days.” Zanesville Times-Recorder, March 15, 1952.

“Terror on a highway.” Kansas City (MO) Times, March 7, 1952.

“Who's scared? Er, how much for bullet-proof windows?” Charleston (WV) Daily Mail, February 15, 1952.

SOURCES – Blue Phantom

“Blue phantom fires at three motorists Sunday, police hear.” Dixon Evening Telegraph, June 9, 1952.

“Blue phantom gunman's raiding continues in Illinois.” Tucson (AZ) Daily Citizen, June 7, 1952.

“Blue phantom gunman sought for shooting at motorists.” Denton (TX) Record-Chronicle, June 9, 1952.

“Blue phantom on prowl in Fairview – with water gun.” Decatur Daily Review, June 13, 1952.

“Blue phantom reports spread to Indiana.” Mattoon Journal-Gazette, June 10, 1952.

“Blue phantom sniper fires on motorists from fast car.” Mount Vernon Register-News, May 31, 1952.

“Boy, 16, adds to confusion in mystery shooting.” St. Louis (MO) Globe-Democrat, June 1, 1952.

“Bullet near body hampers inquiry.” Joplin (MO) Globe, June 1, 1952.

“Canton man released.” Edwardsville Intelligencer, June 12, 1952.

“Car which backfires may be phantom.” Bloomington Pantagraph, June 15, 1952.

“Drive to grab blue phantom intensified.” Mattoon Journal Gazette, June 9, 1952.

“Gunman sought near Decatur.” Decatur Herald, June 17, 1952.

“He sees the blue phantom.” Dixon Evening Telegraph, June 6, 1952.

“Holbrook tells of gunman on Route 128.” Decatur Daily Review, June 7, 1952.

“Monticello lion, move over.” Decatur Daily Review, June 11, 1952.

“Officers' car hit by gunfire from phantom.” Decatur Herald, June 16, 1952.

“One blue phantom scare was youth with rubber gun.” Mount Vernon Register-News, June 12, 1952.

“Phantom gunman continues Midwest sniping attacks.” Medford (OR) Mail Tribune, June 8, 1952.

“Phantom gunman, or the weather?” Decatur Herald, June 12, 1952.

“Phantom reported, say 3 cars shot at on highway.” Jacksonville Daily Journal, June 15, 1952.

“Phantom shooting here this noon.” Decatur Daily Review, June 2, 1952.

“Phantom sniper uses blanks now.” Terre Haute (IN) Tribune, June 14, 1952.

“Phantom snipes at 5 more drivers.” Carroll (IA) Daily Times-Herald, June 7, 1952.

“Phantom strikes,” Decatur Herald, June 17, 1952.

“Police on alert but doubt stories of blue phantom.” Jacksonville Daily Journal, June 11, 1952.

“Police take to air in hunt for blue phantom.” Mount Vernon Register-News, June 7, 1952.

“Raack shooting suspect fires on third motorist.” St. Louis (MO) Globe-Democrat, June 2, 1952.

“State police halt cars to hunt phantom.” Columbia City (IN) Commercial-Mail, June 3, 1952.

“Wabash subway shot renews phantom chase.” Decatur Herald, June 20, 1952.

Bartholomew, Robert and Hilary Evans. Outbreak! The Encyclopedia of Extraordinary Social Behavior. San Antonio: Anomalist Books, 2009.

https://time.com/3880033/behind-the-picture-love-atop-a-flagpole-1946/

http://www.genealogypitstop.com/chestermayor.pdf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Route_66_in_Illinois

August 31st, 2019    

48 - The Affair of the Poisons, Part Three

Allegations of Satanism and black magic take the place of poisoning as the Affair of the Poisons draws to a close.

Episode 48 Photo Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.d.gable/media_set?set=a.10217484829746190&type=3

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

My Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/forgdark/

Opening music:
From https://filmmusic.io
"Dark Child" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)
License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES

Barine, Arvède. Louis XIV and La Grande Mademoiselle 1652-1693. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1905.

De Savoie-Carignan, Guy Jean Raoul Eugène Charles Emmanuel, Count de Soissons. The Seven Richest Heiresses of France. London: John Long Limited, 1911.

Duramy, Benedetta Faedi. “Women and Poisons in 17th Century France,” Chicago-Kent Law Review 87:2 (2012).

Funck-Brentano, Frantz. Princes and Poisoners: Studies of the Court of Louis XIV (George Maidment, trans.). London: Duckworth and Co., 1901.

Gardner, Gerald. The Meaning of Witchcraft. Boston: Weiser Books, 2004 (reprint of 1957 edition).

Hilton, Lisa. Athénaïs: the Life of Louis XIV's Mistress, the Real Queen of France. New York: Back Bay Books, 2004.

Lair, Jules Auguste. Louise de la Valliere and the Early Life of Louis XIV (Ethel Colburn Mayne, trans.). New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1908.

Latour, Théresè Louis. Princesses, Ladies and Adventuresses of the Reign of Louis XIV. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1924.

Somerset, Anne. The Affair of the Poisons: Murder, Infanticide and Satanism in the Court of King Louis XIV. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2003.

Summers, Montague. A Popular History of Witchcraft. Mineola, NY: Dover, 2006 (reprint of 1937 edition).

―. The Geography of Witchcraft. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978 (repr. of 1927 edition).

Voltaire. The Age of Louis XIV, vol. 12 of The Works of Voltaire (William F. Fleming, trans.). New York: E.R. Dumont, 1901.

Williams, H. Noel. Madame de Montespan and Louis XIV. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1910.

http://www.angelfire.com/az3/synagogasatanae/zacharias.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Angélique_de_Scorailles

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_fly

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cantharidin

August 23rd, 2019    

47 - The Affair of the Poisons, Part Two

In the wake of the sensational trial and execution of Madame de Brinvilliers, Paris was scandalized by the discovery of an occult underground believed to be responsible for a number of poisonings of people great and small alike. In Part One of this multi-part episode, I detailed the first few arrests made in the latter part of the 1670s, those associated with Madeleine de la Grange, with Louis de Vanens, and with Marie Vigoreaux and Marie Bossé. With the discovery of another woman's name, the arrests were soon to cross into some of the highest in the land.

Episode 47 Photo Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.d.gable/media_set?set=a.10217426572729801&type=3

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

My Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/forgdark/

Opening music: from https://filmmusic.io"Dark Child" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)
License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES

Duramy, Benedetta Faedi. “Women and Poisons in 17th Century France,” Chicago-Kent Law Review 87:2 (2012).

Funck-Brentano, Frantz. Princes and Poisoners: Studies of the Court of Louis XIV (translated by George Maidment). London: Duckworth and Co., 1901.

Somerset, Anne. The Affair of the Poisons: Murder, Infanticide and Satanism in the Court of King Louis XIV. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2003.

Summers, Montague. The Geography of Witchcraft. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978 (repr. of 1927 edition).

Williams, H. Noel. Madame de Montespan and Louis XIV. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1910.

http://partylike1660.com/catherine-monvoisin-fortune-teller-sorceress-and-poisoner/

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/ground-glass-deadly/

 

 

 

 

August 14th, 2019    

46 - The Affair of the Poisons, Part One - The Heirs of de Brinvilliers

After the imprisonment and eventual execution of Madame de Brinvilliers, a network of murderers masquerading as fortune-tellers began to be revealed throughout Paris. Were these people actually guilty of widespread poisonings? Or was it merely a witch hunt?

Episode 46 Photo Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.d.gable/media_set?set=a.10217358250221781&type=3

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

My Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/forgdark/

Opening music by Kevin MacLeod.

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES

Bodin, Jean (Randy A. Scott, translator). The Demon-Mania of Witches (originally published as De la Démonomanie des Sorciers, 1580). Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 1995.

Duramy, Benedetta Faedi. “Women and Poisons in 17th Century France,” Chicago-Kent Law Review 87:2 (2012).

Funck-Brentano, Frantz (George Maidment, translator). Princes and Poisoners: Studies of the Court of Louis XIV. London: Duckworth and Co., 1901.

Guazzo, Francesco Maria (Montague Summers, translator). Compendium Maleficarum: The Montague Summers Edition. New York: Dover, 1988.

Lynn, W.T. “The Comet of 1664.” The Observatory 31 (1908).

Sewell, Elizabeth Missing. Popular History of France, from the Earliest Period to the Death of Louis XIV. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1876.

Somerset, Anne. The Affair of the Poisons: Murder, Infanticide and Satanism in the Court of King Louis XIV. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2003.

Summers, Montague. The Geography of Witchcraft. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978 (repr. of 1927 edition).

http://unknownmisandry.blogspot.com/2012/03/marie-bosse-french-serial-killer-1679.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_de_Vanens

August 6th, 2019    

45 - Madame de Brinvilliers

Called “one of the most famous poisoners and murderers of all time” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the Marquise de Brinvilliers over a ten year period murdered her father and two brothers, as well as attempting a few other murders. The case also had an unintended aftermath...

Episode 45 Photo Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.d.gable/media_set?set=a.10217294657752009&type=3

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

My Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/forgdark/

Opening music by Kevin MacLeod.

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES

“Brinvilliers, Marie Madeleine Marguerite d'Aubray, Marquise de.” Encyclopædia Britannica (1911). https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/1911_Encyclopædia_Britannica/Brinvilliers,_Marie_Madeleine_Marguerite_d%27Aubray,_Marquise_de

Dumas, Alexander. “The Marquise de Brinvilliers” in Celebrated Crimes, vol. 8. New York: P.F. Collier, 1910.

Mackay, Charles. Memoirs of Extraordinary Delusions and the Madness of Crowds. London: National Illustrated Library, 1852.

Somerset, Anne. The Affair of the Poisons: Murder, Infanticide and Satanism in the Court of King Louis XIV. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2003.

Stokes, Hugh. Madame de Brinvilliers and Her Times, 1630-1676. New York: John Lane Company, 1912.

Summers, Montague. Witchcraft and Black Magic. Mineola, NY: Dover, 2012 (reprint of 1946 ed.)

https://www.thehairpin.com/2014/07/the-big-book-of-female-killers-chapter-2-the-marquise-de-brinvilliers/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gobelins_Manufactory

July 29th, 2019    

44 - Bitten By Phantoms

The cases of the Romanian Eleonore Zugun, the Filipina Clarita Villanueva, and the English Giles children, all of whom were supposedly bitten by invisible phantoms.

Episode 44 Photo Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.d.gable/media_set?set=a.10217236750224357&type=3

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

Opening music by Kevin MacLeod.

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES

“13-year-old girl psychic puzzles Europe's scientists,” Kingsport (TN) Times, November 7, 1926.

“A priest battles devils to save girl,” Singapore Free Press, May 23, 1953.

“Dracula nervous fits?” Townsville (Aus.) Daily Bulletin, May 22, 1953.

“Dracula victim can be cured,” Melbourne (Aus.) Argus, May 21, 1953.

“Ghost that bites girl to be exorcised,” Adelaide (Aus.) Advertiser, May 20, 1953.

“Girl faints as spirits bite,” The Straits Times, May 19, 1953.

“Girl in fits tells of handsome man,” Singapore Free Press, May 20, 1953.

“Is there a personal devil? Courts of Munich have been called to decide,” Abilene (TX) Reporter-News, March 27, 1927.

“Maid astounds men of science,” Newport (RI) Mercury, December 25, 1926.

“Manila mayor confirms spook attacks on girl,” Beaver County (PA) Times, May 20, 1953.

“New light on the last days of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle,” Psypioneer 2:7 (July 2006).

“Solving the mystery of the amazing 'stigmata girl' who puzzled two nations,” Ogden (UT) Standard-Examiner, February 24, 1929.

“Witch child's psychic powers baffle Britons – girl's presence makes articles fly about room,” El Paso Herald, January 1, 1927.

Bartholomew, Robert and Hilary Evans. Outbreak! The Encyclopedia of Extraordinary Social Behavior. San Antonio: Anomalist, 2009.

Bilu, Yoram. “The taming of the deviants and beyond: an analysis of dybbuk possession and exorcism in Judaism,” in Matt Goldish, ed., Spirit Possession in Judaism: Cases and Contexts from the Middle Ages to the Present. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2003.

Clarkson, Michael. The Poltergeist Phenomenon: An In-Depth Investigation Into Floating Beds, Smashing Glass, and Other Unexplained Disturbances. Pompton Plains, NJ: New Page, 2011.

Latimer, John. The Annals of Bristol in the Eighteenth Century. London: The Author, 1893.

Malacz, Peter. “Eleonore Zugun – the re-evaluation of an historic RSPK case,” Journal of Parapsychology 63:1, 1999.

Price, Harry. Fifty Years of Psychical Research. London: Longmans, Green, and Company, 1939.

Russell, W. Ritchie. “Major hysteria,” British Medical Journal, April 27, 1935.

Sigerson, George. “A lecture on certain phenomena of hysteria major, delivered at La Salpétrière, November 17th, by Professor Charcot,” British Medical Journal, November 30, 1878.

Somer, Eli. “Trance possession disorder in Judaism: sixteenth century dybbuks in the near east,” Journal of Trauma & Dissociation 5:2, 2004.

Summers, Montague. The Geography of Witchcraft. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978 (repr. of 1927 edition).

–. The Vampire, His Kith and Kin. New York: E.P. Dutton, 1929.

Sumrall, Lester. Bitten By Devils. South Bend, IN: LeSEA Publishing, 1987.

http://www.skeptophilia.com/2013/05/why-anecdote-isnt-enough-strange-story.html

http://anomalyinfo.com/Stories/1953-may-9-19-ca-clarita-villanueva-attacked-invisible-fangs

https://mysteriousuniverse.org/2013/04/eleonore-zugun-the-romanian-ghost-girl-possessed-by-dracu/

https://www.collegeofpsychicstudies.co.uk/about/page/id/8/college-history

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stigmata

https://oca.org/questions/romancatholicism/manifestations

 

 

 

 

 

July 22nd, 2019    

43 - The Case of Eliza Armstrong

The case of a missing girl in 1885 London leads to the passage of a law raising the age of consent and more strongly prosecuting sex offenses. But when the girl herself is returned to her mother unharmed, questions arise...

Episode 43 Photo Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.d.gable/media_set?set=a.10217189640926654&type=3

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

Opening music by Kevin MacLeod.

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES

“A missing daughter,” Pall Mall Gazette, July 13, 1885.

“Charles Armstrong again.” Pall Mall Gazette, February 25, 1886.

“Eliza Armstrong's brother.” Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, July 11, 1897.

“The maiden tribute of the modern Babylon – I.” Pall Mall Gazette, July 6, 1885.

“News of Eliza Armstrong,” Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, June 9, 1889.

“The abduction of Eliza Armstrong.” Manchester Guardian, September 8. 1885.

“The Armstrong abduction case,” Manchester Weekly Times and Examiner, November 14, 1885.

“The Armstrong case, summing up and verdict.” Birmingham Daily Post, November 9, 1885.

“The case of Eliza Armstrong – the lost child recovered,” Illustrated Police News, September 5, 1885.

“The Eliza Armstrong case,” Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, August 23, 1885.

“The mother and her lost child – further strange disclosures – Mr. Bramwell Booth throws a light on the mystery,” Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, August 16, 1885.

“The return of Eliza Armstrong,” Pall Mall Gazette, August 25, 1885.

“Working the Criminal Law Amendment Act,” Pall Mall Gazette, August 5, 1885.

Butler, Josephine. Rebecca Jarrett. London: Morgan and Scott, 1886.

Gaston, Edward Page, ed. British Supplement to the New Encyclopedia of Social Reform. London and New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 1908.

Le Feuvre, Cathy. The Armstrong Girl: A Child for Sale. Oxford: Lion Hudson, 2015.

Plowden, Alison. The Case of Eliza Armstrong: A Child of 13 Bought for £5. London: BBC, 1974.

https://attackingthedevil.co.uk/pmg/tribute/armstrong/

https://www.churchtimes.co.uk/articles/2015/29-may/features/features/saved-from-the-streets

https://blogs.bl.uk/untoldlives/2012/04/whatever-happened-to-eliza-armstrong.html

https://blogs.bl.uk/untoldlives/2016/03/eliza-armstrong-still-elusive.html

 

 

July 17th, 2019    

42 - First Anniversary Anthology

An anthology of some smaller stories. An attempted resurrection; a case of either auto-hypnosis or insanity, no one is sure which; a ghost in Newark, NJ; the Knickerbocker Ghost of Brooklyn; a headless flying man; a wild woman; and the Witch Rock of Hopkins Hill, RI.

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

Opening music by Kevin MacLeod.

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES

“A witch's rock,” Winfield (KS) Daily Courier, September 3, 1885.
“Brooklyn ghost: pshaw!” New York Times, November 23, 1894.
"Bury son to restore life,” Los Angeles Times, November 3, 1924.
“Crowds watch for a ghost,” New York Evening World, May 18, 1894.
“Ghost with a bass voice,” New York Evening World, May 17, 1894.
“Headless man,” Hartford (KY) Republican, May 6, 1904.
“Scared by a wild creature,” New York Times, October 20, 1882.
“Who can release this mental prisoner?” St. Louis (MO) Republic, May 25, 1902.

July 13th, 2019    

41 - Pedro

In the 1930s, two gold prospectors working in the mountains of Wyoming find a mummy of a tiny man only about a foot in height. Does it change everything we know about human evolution in North America? Or is the truth of the matter far more... normal than it appears on the surface?

Episode 41 Photo Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.d.gable/media_set?set=a.10217121741189203&type=3

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

Opening music by Kevin MacLeod.

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES

“A race of pygmies,” St. Louis (MO) Post-Dispatch, May 26, 1896.

“About Mammoth Cave,” Moberly (MO) Monitor-Index, November 22, 1912.

“Did a race of pygmies once live in America?” Milwaukee Sentinel, August 17, 1941.

“Glenrock lease sold,” Casper Star-Tribune, October 22, 1917.

“Pygmy skeleton dug up,” Billings (MT) Weekly Gazette, August 30, 1907.

“Woman scribe believes sex equality overdue,” Clovis (NM) News-Journal, October 20, 1966.

Aufderheide, Arthur. The Scientific Study of Mummies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

Clark, Ella E. Indian Legends from the Northern Rockies. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1966.

Schneck, Robert Damon. The President's Vampire. San Antonio: Anomalist Books, 2005.

Yule, Henry, trans. The Book of Ser Marco Polo, the Venetian, Concerning the Kingdoms and Marvels of the East (2 vols.). London: John Murray, 1871.

https://www.wyohistory.org/encyclopedia/pedro-mountain-mummy

https://www.sideshowworld.com/110-Mummy/2015/Educational/Mini-Mummy.html

http://scarc.library.oregonstate.edu/coll/pauling/blood/quotes/s._leonard_wadler.html

http://karlshuker.blogspot.com/2016/06/remembering-pedro-missing-mini-mummy-of.html

http://karlshuker.blogspot.com/2009/04/north-americas-elusive-babyfeet-part-1.html

http://www.badarchaeology.com/out-of-place-artefacts/anomalous-human-remains/the-‘beartooth-highway-molar’/

 

 

- Older Posts »