Forgotten Darkness

Strange things are lost and forgotten in obscure corners of the newspaper.

August 31st, 2019    

48 - The Affair of the Poisons, Part Three

Allegations of Satanism and black magic take the place of poisoning as the Affair of the Poisons draws to a close.

Episode 48 Photo Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.d.gable/media_set?set=a.10217484829746190&type=3

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

My Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/forgdark/

Opening music:
From https://filmmusic.io
"Dark Child" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)
License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES

Barine, Arvède. Louis XIV and La Grande Mademoiselle 1652-1693. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1905.

De Savoie-Carignan, Guy Jean Raoul Eugène Charles Emmanuel, Count de Soissons. The Seven Richest Heiresses of France. London: John Long Limited, 1911.

Duramy, Benedetta Faedi. “Women and Poisons in 17th Century France,” Chicago-Kent Law Review 87:2 (2012).

Funck-Brentano, Frantz. Princes and Poisoners: Studies of the Court of Louis XIV (George Maidment, trans.). London: Duckworth and Co., 1901.

Gardner, Gerald. The Meaning of Witchcraft. Boston: Weiser Books, 2004 (reprint of 1957 edition).

Hilton, Lisa. Athénaïs: the Life of Louis XIV's Mistress, the Real Queen of France. New York: Back Bay Books, 2004.

Lair, Jules Auguste. Louise de la Valliere and the Early Life of Louis XIV (Ethel Colburn Mayne, trans.). New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1908.

Latour, Théresè Louis. Princesses, Ladies and Adventuresses of the Reign of Louis XIV. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1924.

Somerset, Anne. The Affair of the Poisons: Murder, Infanticide and Satanism in the Court of King Louis XIV. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2003.

Summers, Montague. A Popular History of Witchcraft. Mineola, NY: Dover, 2006 (reprint of 1937 edition).

―. The Geography of Witchcraft. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978 (repr. of 1927 edition).

Voltaire. The Age of Louis XIV, vol. 12 of The Works of Voltaire (William F. Fleming, trans.). New York: E.R. Dumont, 1901.

Williams, H. Noel. Madame de Montespan and Louis XIV. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1910.

http://www.angelfire.com/az3/synagogasatanae/zacharias.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Angélique_de_Scorailles

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_fly

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cantharidin

August 23rd, 2019    

47 - The Affair of the Poisons, Part Two

In the wake of the sensational trial and execution of Madame de Brinvilliers, Paris was scandalized by the discovery of an occult underground believed to be responsible for a number of poisonings of people great and small alike. In Part One of this multi-part episode, I detailed the first few arrests made in the latter part of the 1670s, those associated with Madeleine de la Grange, with Louis de Vanens, and with Marie Vigoreaux and Marie Bossé. With the discovery of another woman's name, the arrests were soon to cross into some of the highest in the land.

Episode 47 Photo Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.d.gable/media_set?set=a.10217426572729801&type=3

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

My Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/forgdark/

Opening music: from https://filmmusic.io"Dark Child" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)
License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES

Duramy, Benedetta Faedi. “Women and Poisons in 17th Century France,” Chicago-Kent Law Review 87:2 (2012).

Funck-Brentano, Frantz. Princes and Poisoners: Studies of the Court of Louis XIV (translated by George Maidment). London: Duckworth and Co., 1901.

Somerset, Anne. The Affair of the Poisons: Murder, Infanticide and Satanism in the Court of King Louis XIV. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2003.

Summers, Montague. The Geography of Witchcraft. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978 (repr. of 1927 edition).

Williams, H. Noel. Madame de Montespan and Louis XIV. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1910.

http://partylike1660.com/catherine-monvoisin-fortune-teller-sorceress-and-poisoner/

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/ground-glass-deadly/

 

 

 

 

August 14th, 2019    

46 - The Affair of the Poisons, Part One - The Heirs of de Brinvilliers

After the imprisonment and eventual execution of Madame de Brinvilliers, a network of murderers masquerading as fortune-tellers began to be revealed throughout Paris. Were these people actually guilty of widespread poisonings? Or was it merely a witch hunt?

Episode 46 Photo Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.d.gable/media_set?set=a.10217358250221781&type=3

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

My Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/forgdark/

Opening music by Kevin MacLeod.

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES

Bodin, Jean (Randy A. Scott, translator). The Demon-Mania of Witches (originally published as De la Démonomanie des Sorciers, 1580). Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 1995.

Duramy, Benedetta Faedi. “Women and Poisons in 17th Century France,” Chicago-Kent Law Review 87:2 (2012).

Funck-Brentano, Frantz (George Maidment, translator). Princes and Poisoners: Studies of the Court of Louis XIV. London: Duckworth and Co., 1901.

Guazzo, Francesco Maria (Montague Summers, translator). Compendium Maleficarum: The Montague Summers Edition. New York: Dover, 1988.

Lynn, W.T. “The Comet of 1664.” The Observatory 31 (1908).

Sewell, Elizabeth Missing. Popular History of France, from the Earliest Period to the Death of Louis XIV. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1876.

Somerset, Anne. The Affair of the Poisons: Murder, Infanticide and Satanism in the Court of King Louis XIV. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2003.

Summers, Montague. The Geography of Witchcraft. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978 (repr. of 1927 edition).

http://unknownmisandry.blogspot.com/2012/03/marie-bosse-french-serial-killer-1679.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_de_Vanens

August 6th, 2019    

45 - Madame de Brinvilliers

Called “one of the most famous poisoners and murderers of all time” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the Marquise de Brinvilliers over a ten year period murdered her father and two brothers, as well as attempting a few other murders. The case also had an unintended aftermath...

Episode 45 Photo Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.d.gable/media_set?set=a.10217294657752009&type=3

Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/

My Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/forgdark/

Opening music by Kevin MacLeod.

Closing music by Soma.

SOURCES

“Brinvilliers, Marie Madeleine Marguerite d'Aubray, Marquise de.” Encyclopædia Britannica (1911). https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/1911_Encyclopædia_Britannica/Brinvilliers,_Marie_Madeleine_Marguerite_d%27Aubray,_Marquise_de

Dumas, Alexander. “The Marquise de Brinvilliers” in Celebrated Crimes, vol. 8. New York: P.F. Collier, 1910.

Mackay, Charles. Memoirs of Extraordinary Delusions and the Madness of Crowds. London: National Illustrated Library, 1852.

Somerset, Anne. The Affair of the Poisons: Murder, Infanticide and Satanism in the Court of King Louis XIV. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2003.

Stokes, Hugh. Madame de Brinvilliers and Her Times, 1630-1676. New York: John Lane Company, 1912.

Summers, Montague. Witchcraft and Black Magic. Mineola, NY: Dover, 2012 (reprint of 1946 ed.)

https://www.thehairpin.com/2014/07/the-big-book-of-female-killers-chapter-2-the-marquise-de-brinvilliers/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gobelins_Manufactory

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